Welcome to this blogpost, fellow herbivorous. This blog would not be mine if sustainability and vegetarianism (or veganism) would not be encouraged 🌿It’s been approx 2 years since I’m vegetarian – time to celebrate with a blog post! In my home country, Belgium, avoiding meat/dairy is not so much of an issue. However, we all know:
Not consuming meat (and/or animal products) + traveling = challenge.
But hey, who is afraid of a little challenge, right? 😏

Basic sentences in the local language

Not all cultures are used to the idea of omitting meat or dairy products. For example, ‘no meat (sin carne)’ in many South American countries means no meat except for chicken and fish. Meaning you might have to face the struggle to clearly mention not to consume ANY meat. You have to accept that not all cultures understand ‘vegetarianism’ or ‘veganism’ and you can not blame them nor get angry. Explain kindly why you prefer to not consume certain foods and I am sure they will try their best to understand. Keep in mind that not everyone has the luxury to ‘choose’ what they eat. (See the end of the article for some basic sentences in foreign languages.)

Research before traveling: find suitable places online

Google is your best friend! 📲 Go online and find some recommended vegetarian-friendly places near you. Another option is to surf to the Happy Cow website or app which finds suitable places for you nearby. You could also join certain Facebook groups or find suitable places through hashtags and geo-tags on Instagram. 

Choose vegan/vegetarian-friendly locations

Many places are very welcoming to us! Think of India, Indonesia, Isreal, and many European countries.

Be flexible

In certain situations, you could consider being more flexible. I know this is not always the easiest decision to make. Last year I traveled to the jungle for a few days where the host did his best to give me food to my liking. In order to show my respect, I tried his freshly caught and cooked fish. In the end, how strict you stick to your diet is completely up to you.

Cook your own meal

Many hostels offer a kitchen where you are free to cook whatever you like. If you use initiatives such as Couchsurfing I’m sure you can – through kind communication – make some arrangements.

Bring food in containers

If you are planning a multi-day hike, or trip you could always take along some pre-made dishes which are made to your wishes, that way you don’t risk getting hungry on your travel!

Food Tour

Living as a vegetarian/vegan is become more ‘popular’ (yay!). Businesses know that, and in order for a business to survive, they have to adapt to the ongoing trends of their customers. Many food tours have the option to join as a non-meat-eater or even have specialized tours.

Get social: Follow fellow vegetarians/vegans travelers on Instagram

Instagram can serve as a source of inspiration. My favorite profiles are:
Justin from Lotusarticoke
Amelie from Mostlyamelie
Caro from Veggiewayfarer
and… My profile of course 😉

🌿 My basic sentences for you! 🌿

Mandarin:
I am vegetarian – 我是素食者 (wǒ shì sùshí zhě) 
I don’t eat meat – 我不吃肉 (wǒ bù chī ròu)
Spanish:
I am vegetarian – soy vegetariano(/a)
I don’t eat meat – No como carne
Dutch:
I am vegetarian – Ik ben vegetarish
I don’t eat meat – Ik eet geen vlees
French:
I am vegetarian – Je suis végétarien(+ne)
I don’t eat meat – Je ne mange pas de viande
Lithuanian:
I am vegetarian – As (Ash) esu Vegetare
I don’t eat meant- As (Ash) nevalgau mesos